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Enforcing your Consumer Rights
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How to protect yourself

Advice from consumer affairs expert Wendy Knowler on how to enforce the Act: There is only so much that the Act can do for consumers, if you want its protection, you have to be prepared to play your part. Apart from the obvious, keeping your end of the deal in terms of paying up when you’ve agreed to, it means being organized. Insist on getting a copy of anything that you put your signature to, keep al your till slips and warranty documentation, and get into the habit of noting the details of your interaction with companies. Get the names of people you speak to, make a note of what they undertook to do, and note the date and time of the call or face-to-face conversation. Use your cell phone camera to take photos for “evidence” down the line – especially when it comes to insurance claims.

Oral complaints

If you complain over the phone or in person: Stay calm, even if you are angry. There is no point in losing your temper or getting angry, especially if the person is not in a position to authorize a refund. Be assertive without being aggressive. Clearly explain your problem and why you are dissatisfied. Speak to the right people in the right order. Start with the sales clerk, then move on to the customer service office or manager, them the business’s head office. Quote your reference, agreement or account number if you have one. Ensure you have all documentation in order relating to your complaint. This includes sales slips, warranties, proof of payment, contracts you may have signed, and any letters you may have written or received from the company concerned. Keep a written record of the conversation/call including: Who did you talk to (name and title)? When? What was their response?

Who to complain to and how

Always start at the central customer complaints/ help facility of the business that your complaint is against. If you are not successful, you should then approach the appropriate organisation. There useful links list the various organisations that deal with consumer concerns: https://www.osti.co.za/useful-information/useful-links/ http://www.creditombud.org.za/useful-links/ Download List of useful Consumer Contacts: (Correct at time of publishing. Please use Google to check an organisation’s number if you have a problem contacting it using a number listed here.) Once you establish the correct organisation to approach, you will need to follow its processes for lodging a complaint.
The information or views in this App are provided for your guidence and should not be seen as a substitute for legal advice. If you require a legal opinion then you are advised to consult with a qualified lawyer.
©
Enforcing your Consumer Rights
the

How to protect yourself

Advice from consumer affairs expert Wendy Knowler on how to enforce the Act: There is only so much that the Act can do for consumers, if you want its protection, you have to be prepared to play your part. Apart from the obvious, keeping your end of the deal in terms of paying up when you’ve agreed to, it means being organized. Insist on getting a copy of anything that you put your signature to, keep al your till slips and warranty documentation, and get into the habit of noting the details of your interaction with companies. Get the names of people you speak to, make a note of what they undertook to do, and note the date and time of the call or face-to-face conversation. Use your cell phone camera to take photos for “evidence” down the line – especially when it comes to insurance claims.

Oral complaints

If you complain over the phone or in person: Stay calm, even if you are angry. There is no point in losing your temper or getting angry, especially if the person is not in a position to authorize a refund. Be assertive without being aggressive. Clearly explain your problem and why you are dissatisfied. Speak to the right people in the right order. Start with the sales clerk, then move on to the customer service office or manager, them the business’s head office. Quote your reference, agreement or account number if you have one. Ensure you have all documentation in order relating to your complaint. This includes sales slips, warranties, proof of payment, contracts you may have signed, and any letters you may have written or received from the company concerned. Keep a written record of the conversation/call including: Who did you talk to (name and title)? When? What was their response?

Who to complain to and how

Always start at the central customer complaints/ help facility of the business that your complaint is against. If you are not successful, you should then approach the appropriate organisation. There useful links list the various organisations that deal with consumer concerns: https://www.osti.co.za/useful-information/useful-links/ http://www.creditombud.org.za/useful-links/ Download List of useful Consumer Contacts: (Correct at time of publishing. Please use Google to check an organisation’s number if you have a problem contacting it using a number listed here.) Once you establish the correct organisation to approach, you will need to follow its processes for lodging a complaint.
The information or views in this App are provided for your guidence and should not be seen as a substitute for legal advice. If you require a legal opinion then you are advised to consult with a qualified lawyer.